About Shady Hollow MUD

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So far Shady Hollow MUD has created 11 blog entries.

Rate Information

What has transpired for the past 8 years with the water and wastewater service in Shady Hollow Municipal Utility District (SHMUD)?

A Municipal Utility District (MUD) is a political subdivision of the State of Texas authorized by the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to provide water, sewage, drainage, and other services within the MUD boundaries.

Shady Hollow MUD is made up of in-district customers and out-of-district customers. In-district customers pay taxes, vote, and can hold office. Out-of- district customers do not pay taxes. To offset not paying taxes, the MUD is authorized to charge higher rates for out-of-district customers. The increased rates are about the same as the average in-district homeowner’s taxes.

In 2013, the City of Austin (COA) and SHMUD signed a Strategic Partnership Agreement (SPA) that authorized annexation of Shady Hollow MUD and the surrounding areas in December 2020. Pursuant to the SPA, the water and wastewater system was transferred to the COA in April 2018, at which time the COA began billing customers for those services. As a result of the pending full annexation in December 2020, SHMUD decided to spend down the reserves which had been accumulated since the MUD was created in December 1980. These reserves, upon annexation, would have been transferred to the COA.

In 2017, SHMUD sued the COA due to excessive wholesale water rates. The settlement included a one-time payment of $850,000 (which was returned to customers in the form of monthly bill credits) and required the COA, upon assumption of the District’s water and wastewater system in April 2018, to maintain the water and wastewater rates charged by SHMUD. The water rates remained the same from 2015- April 2021.

In 2019, the Shady Hollow HOA was successful in passing SB 1468, which effectively prevented full annexation of SHMUD by the COA. SHMUD then negotiated with the COA for the return of its water and wastewater system. The new wholesale water contract with the COA included increased wholesale water rates charged to SHMUD.

I hope this is helpful to understand the increased water bills.

Rate Information2021-06-18T07:05:57-05:00

Billing & Account Inquiries

Shady Hollow residents welcome back to the Municipal Utility District (MUD). There have been questions about billing and setting up accounts.

Shady Hollow MUD received your billing and contact information from the City of Austin during the transfer so you will not need to setup a new account. If you were a previous MUD customer, you will be issued your previous account number. If you moved into Shady Hollow after April 2018, a new account number will be issued.

Online payment through the Payclix account will be permissible after you receive your first bill. You can complete the process as described on http://www.shmud.org/water/.

Shady Hollow MUD does not have a local office so bills will need to be mailed or paid online. Payments will not be accepted at the Shady Hollow HOA drop box or office.

If any more questions, utilize the contact form at http://www.shmud.org/contact/. You can also reach out to us at

Billing & Account Inquiries2021-04-29T07:37:11-05:00

Water Conservation- Indoors

Why?

Using water more efficiently will not only save money but, more importantly, will also help protect the quality of life of future Texans.

With the vastness of Texas, it’s easy to forget two important facts about our state: we are subject to frequent droughts, and our population is projected to double in the next 50 years. The cost of developing new or additional supplies in that same time period is estimated to be $30.7 billion.

To ensure that we have enough water for current and future Texans, we need to reduce the amount of water we waste.

Possible Water Savings

  • High-efficiency toilets, water-efficient washing machines, rainwater harvesting systems, and water-efficient landscaping can all help reduce water use.
    • A low-flush toilet (or low-flow toilet or high efficiency toilet) is a flush toilet that uses significantly less water than a full-flush toilet. Low flush toilets include single-flush models and dual-flush toilets, which typically use 1.6 US gallons per flush for the full flush and 1.28 US gallons for a reduced flush.
  • Water-efficient showerheads and aerators for faucets can significantly reduce the amount of water you use. In fact, installing a water-efficient showerhead is one of the most effective water-saving steps you can take inside your house.
  • Leaking faucets and toilets can waste thousands of gallons of water monthly, and they are inexpensive to fix. A few small changes in your water use habits can make a huge difference in water savings.

Tips in the Bathroom

  • Replace your showerhead with a water-efficient model.
  • Take short showers.
  • Turn off the water while you are shaving. Fill the sink with hot water instead of letting the water run continuously.
  • Never use the toilet to dispose of trash.
  • Don’t waste water when brushing your teeth or washing your hands. Shut off the water until it’s time to rinse.

Tips in the Kitchen

  • Run the dishwasher only when full.
  • Install faucet aerators. You’ll never notice the difference, and you’ll cut your sink water consumption in half!
  • Keep a container of water in the refrigerator. It will be refreshingly cool and won’t waste water.
  • Dry scrape dishes instead of rinsing. Your dishwasher will take care of the rest.
  • Use garbage disposals sparingly. They can waste water unnecessarily.
  • Conventional washing machines use 32 to 59 gallons of water per load. Use the lowest water level setting on the washing machine for light or partial loads whenever possible.
  • Use cold water as often as possible to save energy and conserve hot water for uses that cold water cannot serve.
Water Conservation- Indoors2021-03-12T09:25:25-06:00

Boil Water Notice Lifted 2/23/2021 @ 1:00 p.m.

Austin Water has lifted the boil water notice for all customers. The notice has been in place since Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021. Customers no longer need to boil water used for drinking, cooking and, making ice. Water quality testing submitted to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has confirmed that tap water meets all regulatory standards and is safe for human consumption.

On February 17, the TCEQ required Austin Water, Public Water System ID#TX227001, to issue a Boil Water Notice to inform customers, individuals, or employees that due to conditions which occurred recently in the public water system, the water from this public water system was required to be boiled prior to use for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

The public water system has taken the necessary corrective actions to restore the quality of the water distributed by this public water system used for drinking water or human consumption purposes and has provided TCEQ with laboratory test results that indicate that the water no longer requires boiling prior to use as of February 23, 2021.

“Today we can report that Austin’s water system has been restored to normal operations and the boil water notice has been lifted for all our customers,” said Austin Water Director Greg Meszaros. “There is still a lot to do to repair water pipelines that were damaged by the freezing weather, but customers should only experience occasional impacts from that work. We are thankful for the community’s efforts to conserve water over this past week to help us restore our operations today.”

“Rescinding the boil water notice today is the result of round-the-clock efforts by Austin Water, as well as actions taken by our community to help their neighbors by using less water,” said City Manager Spencer Cronk. “This is a strong community that looks out for each other, and together we’ve achieved this important milestone in our recovery from last week’s freezing event.”

If customers have questions concerning this matter, visit www.austintexas.gov/page/boil-water-notice-and-faqsor follow @austinwater on social media.

Austin Water wholesale customers are conducting additional regulatory work in coordination with The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality before lifting boil water notice for their customers. Austin Water wholesale districts in this list include: Night Hawk, Travis County WCID 10, Windermere, Creedmoor-Maha WSC, Morningside, Rivercrest, San Leanna, Marsha WSC, Wells Branch MUD, Northtown MUD, Manor, Rollingwood, Sunset Valley Customers of Austin Water wholesale customers listed above should contact their provider directly for the latest updates.

Boil Water Notice Lifted 2/23/2021 @ 1:00 p.m.2021-03-05T22:03:27-06:00

Frequently Asked Questions About What to Do After a Drinking Water Advisory

At this time Shady Hollow MUD residents have not had the boil water notice lifted. Once this occurs take nots of FAQs below, from the CDC.

When I turn on the faucet, the water sputters. Why?

  • You have air in your lines. Turn on your tap slowly and run the water until the sputtering stops.

The water is discolored. What should I do?

  • Flush water pipes by running the water until it is clear.
  • Do not wash clothes if the water is discolored. Wait until the water runs clear at the tap. Wash a load of dark clothes first.

Why does my water have a strong smell?

  • The smell is probably chlorine. Often, water systems will increase chlorine levels to disinfect the pipes.

What should I do if my water pressure is low?

  • Check the faucet screens for trapped particles. Remove the screens and clean out any particles. Put the screens back on the faucet.

Do I need to clean out my faucets?

  • Yes. You should flush your faucets after the drinking water advisory.
    • Turn on the main water valve.
    • Turn on the cold water tap at all faucets and run the water until you feel a change in temperature (i.e. the water gets noticeably colder). This may take several minutes. Begin with the faucet that is highest up in your home or building and then open the other faucets one at a time moving from the highest floor to the lowest.

Do I need to clean appliances?

  • Yes. Read the owner’s manual for directions to clean appliances such as water softeners and filter units.

My refrigerator has a water dispenser/ice maker. Do I need to clean them?

  • Yes. Water dispensers and ice makers are connected to your water line. You need to flush and clean them.
  • Follow the directions in the owner’s manual or:
    • Change the filter cartridges.
    • Throw out ice.
    • Flush the water dispenser for 3 to 5 minutes.
    • Run the ice maker for 1 hour.
    • Throw out all the ice.
    • Wash and sanitize bin areas.

Do I need to do something for the water softener?

  • Yes. You may need to run through a regeneration cycle. Follow the directions in the owner’s manual.

I have a water treatment unit for the house. Does it need special care?

  • Yes. Change the filter cartridges. Some units need disinfecting. Follow the directions in the unit’s owner’s manual.
Frequently Asked Questions About What to Do After a Drinking Water Advisory2021-03-05T22:03:26-06:00

Water Update 2/22/2021 @ 8:00 a.m.

Shady Hollow is still under a boil water notice.

Austin Water has partially lifted the boil water notice that has been in place since Wednesday, February 17, 2021. Customers in Austin Water’s Central Pressure Zone no longer need to boil water used for drinking, cooking and making ice. Water quality testing submitted to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has confirmed that tap water in the Central Pressure Zone meets all regulatory standards and is safe for human consumption.

Overnight water storage figures have exceeded 118 million gallons in reserves, increasing system-wide water pressure and bringing Austin’s water system into healthy territory.

The majority of Austin residents should seen marked service improvements with only small pockets of Austin experiencing the lingering effects of the historic freezing event.

Water Update 2/22/2021 @ 8:00 a.m.2021-03-08T19:28:59-06:00

Water Update 2/19/2021 @ 5:00 p.m.

The City of Austin is now producing more water than the city is consuming, allowing it to add water into its reservoirs, which is critical for system health.

Should water storage levels continue to rise, and with the help of its customers sustained efforts to conserve water use across the city, they could potentially restore water service city-wide through the end of this weekend.

Restored city-wide water service is contingent on how much water the city is able to produce. The less you use, the more water can be produced.

Water Update 2/19/2021 @ 5:00 p.m.2021-02-25T22:00:51-06:00

Water Update 2/19/2021 @ 12:00 p.m.

This map shows how the water system across Austin Water’s service area is currently performing. Each of the nine pressure zones that we maintain is shown as an area experiencing water outages (red) or low pressure (orange). The goal is for each zone to get to green again, where the system is operating normally, and the boil water notice can be lifted.

To achieve this, Austin Water is working to: Maintain water pressure in the Central Pressure Zone, which is the delivery hub for both the North and South Zones.

Continue filling water in the other pressure zones to turn those pressure zones orange.

As we work to repair and restore our water system, we need everyone to conserve water as much as possible. Using as little water as possible will allow us to put excess water produced into storage, which is critical for the health of the entire system. As Austin continues to thaw out, please report potential water main breaks here.

This graph shows where we are today in terms of our water production, customer demand or usage, and how much we have stored in reservoirs. For a healthy system, we need to maintain a minimum of 100 million gallons in storage. Today, we are at 32 million gallons and climbing.

Do your part to help us provide what is essential – water. Please conserve as much as possible so that we can get back to normal faster.

 

Water Update 2/19/2021 @ 12:00 p.m.2021-03-08T19:34:48-06:00
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